slurivariv:

theocproject:

world-shaker:

Phonebloks

Don’t get me wrong, the new iPhones look interesting. But this is an excellent idea for the future of cellphones. 

(by Dave Hakkens)

Completely agree with the OP. This is a very democratic, sustainable, and innovative path forward for cell phones. I hope such an idea can catch on.

I support this 100%.

(via ctrayn)

257,370 notes

crookedindifference:

Ethiopian kids hack OLPCs in 5 months with zero instruction

What happens if you give a thousand Motorola Zoom tablet PCs to Ethiopian kids who have never even seen a printed word? Within five months, they’ll start teaching themselves English while circumventing the security on your OS to customize settings and activate disabled hardware.
The One Laptop Per Child project started as a way of delivering technology and resources to schools in countries with little or no education infrastructure, using inexpensive computers to improve traditional curricula. What the OLPC Project has realized over the last five or six years, though, is that teaching kids stuff is really not that valuable. Yes, knowing all your state capitols how to spell “neighborhood” properly and whatnot isn’t a bad thing, but memorizing facts and procedures isn’t going to inspire kids to go out and learn by teaching themselves, which is the key to a good education. Instead, OLPC is trying to figure out a way to teach kids to learn, which is what this experiment is all about.
Rather than give out laptops (they’re actually Motorola Zoom tablets plus solar chargers running custom software) to kids in schools with teachers, the OLPC Project decided to try something completely different: it delivered some boxes of tablets to two villages in Ethiopia, taped shut, with no instructions whatsoever.
They just left the boxes there, sealed up, containing one tablet for every kid in each of the villages (nearly a thousand tablets in total), pre-loaded with a custom English-language operating system and SD cards with tracking software on them to record how the tablets were used. Here’s how it went down, as related by OLPC founder Nicholas Negroponte at MIT Technology Review’s EmTech conference last week:
“We left the boxes in the village. Closed. Taped shut. No instruction, no human being. Within four minutes, one kid not only opened the box, but found the on/off switch. He’d never seen an on/off switch. He powered it up. Within five days, they were using 47 apps per child per day. Within two weeks, they were singing ABC songs [in English] in the village. And within five months, they had hacked Android. Some idiot in our organization or in the Media Lab had disabled the camera! And they figured out it had a camera, and they hacked Android.”


NEAT NEAT NEAT. 
Humans are so amazing  :chinhands:

crookedindifference:

Ethiopian kids hack OLPCs in 5 months with zero instruction

What happens if you give a thousand Motorola Zoom tablet PCs to Ethiopian kids who have never even seen a printed word? Within five months, they’ll start teaching themselves English while circumventing the security on your OS to customize settings and activate disabled hardware.

The One Laptop Per Child project started as a way of delivering technology and resources to schools in countries with little or no education infrastructure, using inexpensive computers to improve traditional curricula. What the OLPC Project has realized over the last five or six years, though, is that teaching kids stuff is really not that valuable. Yes, knowing all your state capitols how to spell “neighborhood” properly and whatnot isn’t a bad thing, but memorizing facts and procedures isn’t going to inspire kids to go out and learn by teaching themselves, which is the key to a good education. Instead, OLPC is trying to figure out a way to teach kids to learn, which is what this experiment is all about.

Rather than give out laptops (they’re actually Motorola Zoom tablets plus solar chargers running custom software) to kids in schools with teachers, the OLPC Project decided to try something completely different: it delivered some boxes of tablets to two villages in Ethiopia, taped shut, with no instructions whatsoever.

They just left the boxes there, sealed up, containing one tablet for every kid in each of the villages (nearly a thousand tablets in total), pre-loaded with a custom English-language operating system and SD cards with tracking software on them to record how the tablets were used. Here’s how it went down, as related by OLPC founder Nicholas Negroponte at MIT Technology Review’s EmTech conference last week:

“We left the boxes in the village. Closed. Taped shut. No instruction, no human being. Within four minutes, one kid not only opened the box, but found the on/off switch. He’d never seen an on/off switch. He powered it up. Within five days, they were using 47 apps per child per day. Within two weeks, they were singing ABC songs [in English] in the village. And within five months, they had hacked Android. Some idiot in our organization or in the Media Lab had disabled the camera! And they figured out it had a camera, and they hacked Android.”

NEAT NEAT NEAT. 

Humans are so amazing  :chinhands:

(via doxian)

12,757 notes

oftaggrivated:

Prepare to be horrified.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

DARPA’s Newest Robot Is Possibly Its Creepiest Ever

We love DARPA’s unsettlingly-lifelikeBigDog bot. We love it in spite of the fact that it’s absolutely terrifying in motion. Now it has some bestial competition: the DARPA Cheetah. Ugh. Its legs. Its legs are so frightening.

Above, the Cheetah sets a speed record for four-legged robots, at 18 MPH. Herculean Olympian speed impossibility Usain Bolt can sprint at around 23 MPH. And he’s a mutant of physical capability.

In other words, this thing can and will chase you down:

The robot’s movements are designed to mimic those of fast-running animals in nature. The robot increases its stride and running speed by flexing and un-flexing its back on each step, much as an actual cheetah does.

The current version of the Cheetah robot runs on a laboratory treadmill where it is powered by an off-board hydraulic pump, and uses a boom-like device to keep it running in the center of the treadmill. Testing of a free-running prototype is planned for later this year.

DARPA won’t elaborate on what the military applications of the Cheetah are—the BigDog is clearly for hauling heavy gear through rough terrain. So what will this metallic hell creature chase, someday, maybe? Terrorists? Bombs? If it can do more than run in a straight line, it’d be pretty killer for recon. Or imagine a hundred of them storming an enemy hideout at once on a suicide mission.

For now, its greatest capability is being extremely creepy to the point of being hard to watch.

I FUCKING LOVE BIGDOG AND FRIENDS.

When does the wacky kid’s show come out? 

67 notes

8bitfuture:

$35 computer starts production.
While the Raspberry Pi computer may be little more than a small circuit board, it is powerful enough to play Quake III and handle Blu-Ray video.
Featuring a 700MHz processor, HDMI port, USB 2.0, and 256MB of memory, the device was the idea of a Cambridge University student back in 2006, after he noticed that new students had far fewer programming skills than in previous years. 

The theory goes that most family computers are large investments for the home, with uses that center around media, and web browsing. Gone are the days when parents can simply let their kids tinker around on the computer, and even if they did allow it, manufacturers aren’t exactly producing builds that are easy to open and understand. The Raspberry Pi Foundation wants to create a computer that any parent can buy for a child (or a child can buy for themselves) and feel comfortable with experimenting.

Both US$35 and $25 models are about to enter production, with 10,000 of the computers to be constructed in the next few weeks, and you can check out their website here.

Neat!

8bitfuture:

$35 computer starts production.

While the Raspberry Pi computer may be little more than a small circuit board, it is powerful enough to play Quake III and handle Blu-Ray video.

Featuring a 700MHz processor, HDMI port, USB 2.0, and 256MB of memory, the device was the idea of a Cambridge University student back in 2006, after he noticed that new students had far fewer programming skills than in previous years. 

The theory goes that most family computers are large investments for the home, with uses that center around media, and web browsing. Gone are the days when parents can simply let their kids tinker around on the computer, and even if they did allow it, manufacturers aren’t exactly producing builds that are easy to open and understand. The Raspberry Pi Foundation wants to create a computer that any parent can buy for a child (or a child can buy for themselves) and feel comfortable with experimenting.

Both US$35 and $25 models are about to enter production, with 10,000 of the computers to be constructed in the next few weeks, and you can check out their website here.

Neat!

(Source: singularityhub.com, via evillordzog)

120 notes